Posts Tagged ‘teenagers’

Test Prep for the SAT and ACT – What You Don’t Know May Hurt You

September 14, 2017

Since the SAT and ACT are important criteria for college admissions, you should not assume that your student can take these tests with no preparation.  Test scores can make or break a student’s chances for college acceptance and scholarships.  Most experts believe that a good test prep course can help to improve students’ SAT and ACT scores.  Here are 5 tips to find a good SAT and ACT test prep course near you:

 

  1. The teaching is most important. Most test prep courses offer similar information, but a good course will have a teacher who can motivate the students.  The course should be taught by an experienced test prep coach, not a high school teacher or someone who has only scored high on the SAT and ACT.

 

  1. The test prep course should be affordable. There is no reason why parents need to spend $1000 for a test prep course.  Paying more does not make a course better nor does a big name make it more effective.  Parents should contact local, small test prep companies and inquire about what they offer before they sign up for another SAT or ACT course.

 

  1. Students should practice and take real tests. Students should only take test prep courses that utilize tests that are published by the College Board and the ACT.  Practice should also be done on real tests.  This helps students to know exactly what to expect and makes for a less stressful experience.  What good is practice if you are not using the real thing?

 

  1. The test prep course should focus on content and strategies. Parents should inquire about whether a test prep course focuses on test-taking strategies or also includes practice materials with review and explanations.  Students need to understand the content of the test, but they also need to know how to approach each part of the test and some test-taking techniques that will help them improve their scores.

 

  1. A test prep course should fit the needs of your child. Is the test prep course small enough to be beneficial? A course should include no more than 8-10 students.  Does it take too much time away from homework and other activities?  Students should spend only as much time as they need and once a week classes should be sufficient.  Will your student learn how to handle anxiety and gain confidence?  Stress relieving practices should be introduced and practiced.

 

Parents should always read the fine print of any test prep course.  There are no score guarantees in spite of what you may be told.  Students are usually given the opportunity to retake the course, but parents do not receive their money back.

Small improvements in test scores can make a difference in college admissions.  That’s why test prep can contribute to the overall success of a student’s chances for college acceptance and merit scholarships.

 

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I raised an addict – what could I have done differently?

July 20, 2015

Parents today must assume that their teenager will be exposed to drugs. Talking about it may not be enough. Good kids can make poor decisions. Knowing everything you need to know about teenagers and drugs and alcohol is an important start. You don’t want to be the parent asking, “What could I have done differently?”

 

I raised an addict – what could I have done differently?

Five Ways that Teenagers Are Just Like Toddlers

September 30, 2014

Five Ways that Teenagers Are Just Like Toddlers.

College Direction helps teenagers with test prep for the SAT and ACT and also with the college planning process. Although I love working with them, I would have to agree that at times there is a resemblance between teenagers and toddlers.

“It is not what…

October 18, 2013

“It is not what you do for your teenagers, but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings.” Ann Landers

A good quote to keep in mind as we go through the college admission process with our children.

Senioritis – A disease affecting high school seniors

January 16, 2013

Senioritis is defined as:
“A crippling disease that strikes high school seniors. Symptoms include: laziness, an over-excessive wearing of track pants, old athletic shirts, sweatpants, athletic shorts, and sweatshirts. Also features a lack of studying, repeated absences, and a generally dismissive attitude. The only known cure is a phenomenon known as graduation.” Urban dictionary

What causes senioritis?  High school seniors have taken their last SAT and ACT test, submitted their college applications and essays, and finished their final exams.  They are now beginning their second and last semester of high school.  Many of them are just plain “over it.”  Some are apprehensive about the changes after graduation and others are experiencing burnout.  They are tired of the academic and social scene and ready to move on, but this too causes anxiety and moodiness.

Some high school seniors will skip their classes, ignore their homework, and be apathetic to things they used to enjoy.  They may be uncommunicative with their parents and seem uninterested in their future.  Chances are they have senioritis.  While it is easy to provide answers as to how this can happen, high school seniors need to understand that colleges will receive their second semester grades and will not look favorably on students who have been academic slackers.

What can a parent do about senioritis?  As a private college counselor, I suggest that you direct your high school senior’s attention to this article for a good dose of reality. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/education/edlife/rescind22.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0