Posts Tagged ‘paying for college’

How to Pay for College: Sharing the Responsibility

May 8, 2012

Paying for college is a daunting task for parents and students alike.  Every year college tuition at most schools continues to increase.  Tuition does not cover all of the expenses; you must also include room and board, meal plans, books, transportation, etc.    Everything you read states the one obvious fact:  College is expensive.  Parents should always apply for financial aid by filling out the FAFSA online, even if you think you will not qualify.  Sometimes you are pleasantly surprised.  Students should apply for any scholarships for which they meet the minimum requirements.  Both parents and students need to be resourceful in finding ways to pay for college.  Sharing the responsibility for college expenses can be a positive experience for students.  It also makes them have a vested interest in their education.  Read the following article to find out more.  http://www.golocalprov.com/lifestyle/college-admissions-why-every-child-should-help-pay-for-college/

http://www.collegedirection.org

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Figuring Out Your Financial Aid Award and What You Can Do About It

March 22, 2012

Figuring Out Your Financial Aid Award and What You Can Do About It

As more and more families receive their financial aid awards, they need to start comparing what different colleges are offering.  Two or three financial aid awards might look quite similar, but actually be very different.  Considering the cost of each college is a good place to begin.  Next, you should see what the awards consist of:  Scholarships, work-study, loans, etc.  Obviously you want to look at the award that will incur the least amount of debt.  If your child is set on a particular college but the financial aid award is not as good as another school, check this website out for how to appeal to a college to get more money.  http://www.thecollegesolution.com/an-inside-look-at-financial-aid-appeals

10 Ways to Help You Pay for College

March 1, 2012

What parents aren’t shocked when they look at the sticker price at most colleges and universities?  College is the biggest investment most families will make with the exception of buying a house.  What can you do to make paying for college a little less painful?

1.  Fill out the FAFSA form whether you think you qualify for financial aid or not.

2.  Wait until you receive your financial aid package from a college to compare it to other schools.  Negotiate with a college to get the best deal.

3.  Encourage your child to apply for scholarships from colleges, local organizations, and your workplace or for a specific college major.

4.  Have your child start looking for a summer job and use those earnings toward college expenses.

5.  Compare the dorms where your child will be attending college and choose the one that is the most reasonable.

6.  Check out the meal plans where your child will be attending college and select the one that meets your child’s eating habits.

7.  As soon as class schedules are available, have your child try to buy textbooks online or at least used from the college bookstore.

8.  Have your child get a part-time job either through work-study or in the community.

9.  Look at both public and private schools and consider those that are committed to seeing your student graduate in four years.

10.If you child needs to fly to college, stick with one airline and make your reservations as far ahead as possible.

Financial Aid for College: Why Most Families Need to Apply

February 9, 2012

Most families are overwhelmed with the thought of paying for college.  They find the financial aid process confusing and some don’t even bother to apply.  Parents need to be encouraged to fill out the FAFSA form, and the CSS if applicable, even if they think they make too much money to qualify for financial aid.  Families with college-bound students need to understand the fundamentals of applying for financial aid.  There are so many myths surrounding the financial aid process and they need to be demystified.  Parents need to understand that a financial aid package consists of a combination of loans, scholarships and grants, and work-study programs.  Private scholarships are available, but they usually make up a very small percentage of money for college.  Helping students find schools that are affordable is not always as difficult as it may seem.  Some colleges are definitely more generous with financial aid and merit scholarships.  Click on the following link to clarify some of the misinformation about financial aid. http://wildammo.com/2011/10/19/8-myths-about-financial-aid-infographic/

How to Pay for College: 5 Places to Look for College Scholarships

February 6, 2012

Scholarships are like free money for college.  They often take some time and effort but they can help you pay for college.  Here are 5 places to look:

First, check out scholarships that can be found in your high school college counseling office.

Then, contact each college to which you have applied and ask about any scholarships they may offer.

Next, sign up for some scholarship searches such as scholarships360, fast web, and broke scholar.

Then, check with local and national businesses and organizations like Rotary, parent’s employer, religious affiliations, etc.

Finally, consider special circumstances such as your prospective major, being a minority, or community service.

 

 

FAFSA: First Step to Take for Financial Aid

January 12, 2012

FAFSA: First Step to Take for Financial Aid

FAFSA, which stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid, is an online form which determines which students are eligible for federal financial assistance. No one should be intimidated by the FAFSA form and everyone who feels they might qualify for federal, state, or institutional grants or loans should definitely apply.

Applying for financial aid is not as overwhelming as it used to be, but it does require time and accurate answers to allow the government to determine what your Expected Family Contribution toward college will be. This is known as your EFC. The FAFSA form is filled out by the parents of prospective and continuing students on an annual basis. There are about 130 questions on the online form. They are both personal and financial. Paying for college is one of the biggest concerns parents have today. Last year more than 80% of the parents who had students applying or returning to college filled out the FAFSA form. You have nothing to lose by filling out the free form and some families are pleasantly surprised that they actually qualify for at least some financial assistance. Every little bit helps