Posts Tagged ‘college students’

Is Your High School Graduate Ready to Transition to College?

May 23, 2019

Soon after students graduate from high school, it is important to begin the “transition to college” conversations with your teens to help them better acclimate to this new experience. It is not just the academic changes they will encounter, but more importantly an opportunity to discuss what they will need to do in order to have a successful transition.

As a college admissions consultant, I make an appointment with each student to discuss time management, financial matters and getting off on the right start. I know that many students are academically prepared, but the college schedule is usually dramatically different from what they are used to in high school. They need to learn where and when to study and understand the expectations of their college professors. They also need to know where to go if they need academic help.

New college students need to understand how to handle their finances and learn the basics of financial literacy so that their credit remains good and they do not get into problems involving money. Most importantly, students need to be responsible with credit cards and realize how easy it is to go into debt by charging items and not paying off the balance. Too many credit companies prey on college students.

As a independent college consultant, I like to pay special attention to safety on a college campus and helping students do everything they can to use the necessary precautions. I think every student needs to understand how drinking and drugs can be the road to disaster. I emphasize, especially with the young women, that they come together and leave together when attending a party or event, watch their drinks and never leave them unattended, and be very cautious when walking on a campus at night.

Since mental health is such a big issue on college campuses, I emphasize to every student how important it is to get help if they feel anxious, depressed or suicidal. Students should know where to go on the college campus to get the assistance they need and not wait and hope things will get better. They also need to tell their parents how they are feeling so that their parents can intervene if necessary.

These are just a few of the “transition to college” talks to have with your student. They need not be long, but they do need to be discussed. I think if parents begin these conversations during the summer, students will feel more confident as they begin their college experience.

College Direction meets with high school graduates and their parents to have the “transition to college” conversation. Call 303-692-1918 if you are interested. Sometimes students respond better to a college consultant because I am not their parent.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

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College Students: Home for the Holidays

November 15, 2017

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John was used to living in the fraternity house and coming and going as he pleased. Molly lived in a dorm and enjoyed have students hanging out in her room at most times of the day and night. Both students were used to their freedom and had some confusing emotions about spending their first Thanksgiving or winter break with the family. Most parents are excited to see their college kids and hope to spend some “quality time” together.  Many kids have their own ideas. They have been away for months and want to just “hang” as they do in college. More than likely, you are anticipating the holidays to be different than they are.

 

While you might suggest they catch up on their sleep, they will be eager to take off and enjoy some “quality” time with their friends. Even though they have probably been texting them regularly, it’s just not the same as seeing them in person.

 

What’s a parent to do? Here are a few tips to make the holidays a less stressful time with your college kids and enjoyable for everyone:

 

  1. Let your kids know that you are excited to have them home and that you really want them to enjoy their time while they are there. Ask what they would like to do while they are at home and what kind of family activities they may be up for. Face the fact that holidays are stressful and don’t count on things going perfectly.

 

  1. Talk with your kids about their semester and show an interest in their college life so that grades are not the only area about which you appear to care. Ask questions that don’t have yes or no answers and don’t sound like you are interrogating them. This can be stressful for both of you.

 

  1. Talk about family rules that you have always had, but discuss them calmly and be willing to compromise a little. Tell them that you would like to know about their plans so that you don’t schedule something that might conflict. Let them know that you expect them to answer their cell phone if you need to text or call.

 

  1. Tell your kids that you respect their new independence and you wouldn’t want it any other way. Explain, however, that with independence comes responsibility and you hope to see that at home as well as when they are away at school. This includes drinking, driving and using good judgment.

 

  1. Deal with the messy room, sleeping till noon, and the frenzy of friends in and out. Relax a little and remember the holiday break only lasts for a few weeks. Of course, this is not the way you want to live all the time, but sometimes to maintain your sanity it is best to let some things go. Your college kids will appreciate it and it will do a lot to make the holidays less stressful.